ISU Electrical and Computer Engineering Archives

A static analysis of maximum wind penetration in Iowa and a dynamic assessment of frequency response in wind turbine types

Vittal, Eknath (2008) A static analysis of maximum wind penetration in Iowa and a dynamic assessment of frequency response in wind turbine types. Masters thesis, Iowa State University.

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Abstract

As the energy industry moves into the 21st century the use and research into renewable resources has expanded significantly. Whether it is wind, biomass, or solar, the industry is seeking ways to breakthrough and integrate the newest technologies into their power systems. Wind energy, in particular, has seen significant expansion since the 1980’s, with generating capability of wind turbines increasing dramatically from 50 kW to nearly 5 MW presently. Currently, the United States has over 16,818 MW of installed wind generation spread across the country with 1237 MW installed in Iowa. As the price fuel and environmental concerns grow, wind generation has proven to be an efficient and fiscally sound alternative for the energy industry. Seeking to introduce larger levels of wind generation in the Iowa electricity system, the goal of this thesis was to: First, determine the maximum wind penetration level of the existing transmission system in Iowa based on thermal loading limitations. Second, identify effects of increased wind penetration on system frequency response. To determine the maximum wind penetration level a static analysis was completed on the 2008 Summer MISO base case. By identifying regions suited to support high levels of wind generation and completing power flow analyses on the system at steadily increasing penetration levels, the maximum penetration level for the existing transmission system in the state was identified based it’s thermal loading limitations. When large levels of wind generation are present in a system the level of spinning inertial reserve may be reduced based on the type of wind turbine installed. Using a small, 6-bust test system, dynamic simulations were carried out to observe the frequency response of two types of wind turbines, the doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) and fixed speed generator (FSG) wind turbines.

EPrint Type:Thesis (Masters)
Subjects:Electrical Engineering > ELECTRIC POWER & ENERGY SYSTEMS > Power System Dynamics, Control, Decision and Risk Analysis
ID Code:409
Identification Number:Identification Number UNSPECIFIED
Deposited By:Eknath Vittal
Deposited On:25 March 2008

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